Mary Chapman, features writer —

Mary graduated from Wayne State University with a degree in journalism. She began her career at United Press International, then spent a decade reporting for the Bureau of National Affairs, Inc. (now Bloomberg Industry Group). Mary has written extensively for The New York Times, and her work has appeared in publications such as Time, Newsweek, Fortune, and the Chicago Tribune. She’s won a Society of Professional Journalists award for outstanding reporting.

Articles by Mary Chapman

How to Help a Family Member With aHUS

Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) can lead to multiple health problems that affect the day-to-day life of a patient. Here are some ways in which family members can help support a person living with this extremely rare disease. What is aHUS? aHUS is characterized by blood clotting…

Signs of Depression in aHUS Caregivers

It can be exhausting and stressful to be the caregiver for someone who has a chronic disorder such as atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS). Because stress can trigger anxiety and depression, among other issues, it is imperative that you practice self-care in order to stay healthy.

The aHUS Tracker

If you have atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS), you need to have regular blood tests to check the health of your kidneys and your platelet and red blood cell counts. It is important to track your results over time. Here’s some information about how to do that,…

Raising Awareness of aHUS

Raising awareness of rare chronic disorders such as atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome, or aHUS, could mean more patients benefiting from earlier diagnosis and treatment. Here are some points about aHUS, and the ongoing efforts to make it more widely known. What is aHUS? One of about…

Self-care Tips for aHUS Patients

For people with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS), self-care is important to help cope with the multiple health problems resulting from the disease, including hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia (low platelet count), kidney failure, nausea, shortness of breath, fatigue, heart disease, and seizures. If you…

Spoon Theory for aHUS Patients

Life can be challenging with a rare and chronic disease like atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS). Family and friends may not be able to understand what you regularly go through. That can be exhausting and frustrating. A metaphor called the spoon theory may help. What is the spoon…