Author Archives: Mary Chapman

Signs of Depression in aHUS Caregivers

It can be exhausting and stressful to be the caregiver for someone who has a chronic disorder such as atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS). Because stress can trigger anxiety and depression, among other issues, it is imperative that you practice self-care in order to stay healthy.

The aHUS Tracker

If you have atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS), you need to have regular blood tests to check the health of your kidneys and your platelet and red blood cell counts. It is important to track your results over time. Here’s some information about how to do that,…

Raising Awareness of aHUS

Raising awareness of rare chronic disorders such as atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome, or aHUS, could mean more patients benefiting from earlier diagnosis and treatment. Here are some points about aHUS, and the ongoing efforts to make it more widely known. What is aHUS? One of about…

Self-care Tips for aHUS Patients

For people with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS), self-care is important to help cope with the multiple health problems resulting from the disease, including hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia (low platelet count), kidney failure, nausea, shortness of breath, fatigue, heart disease, and seizures. If you…

Spoon Theory for aHUS Patients

Life can be challenging with a rare and chronic disease like atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS). Family and friends may not be able to understand what you regularly go through. That can be exhausting and frustrating. A metaphor called the spoon theory may help. What is the spoon…

aHUS Alliance Seeks Input from Ultomiris-treated Patients

To help persuade decision-making entities to make the atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) treatment Ultomiris (ravulizumab) available in countries with socially funded healthcare, aHUS Alliance Global Action is asking patients and caregivers worldwide to contribute their experience with the therapy. The organization is seeking input about the…

Mindfulness for People Living With aHUS

It can be challenging to live with a rare and chronic disease like atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS). Using a tool called mindfulness can help you cope with the stress that often accompanies these challenges. What is mindfulness? Mindfulness is the practice of being constantly aware of…